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Ken Langone Story? how billionaire co-founder of Home Depot?

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Ken Langone
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Ken Langone


Ken Langone, the second of two children, was born in 1935 in Roslyn Heights on Long Island, New York. None of his parents, who were children of Italian immigrants, attended school beyond high school. Ken’s father worked as a plumber and his mother worked in the cafeteria of the small public school across the street from his house.

During Ken’s youth, the economy was weak due to the Great Depression and work for Ken’s father was sporadic. He was a union plumber every hour, which means he was fired at the end of a project until a new project began. In addition to financial struggles, Ken’s father suffered from manic depression. When she entered what the family called “dark periods,” Ken’s mother assumed a more responsible role. “My mother never complained,” says Ken. “ I had a huge sense of optimism and I got that from me, and my two parents had a wonderful ability to give their children unconditional love. It was not for sale and was not marketed. He did not arrive with good grades or get lost with bad grades. They could be unhappy or angry, but under all this, there was a huge and infinite pit of unconditional love. That was a powerful force behind me when I later moved to a competitive world.

ken’s Family

Ken’s two parents came from large families, and he grew up on Long Island surrounded by dozens of relatives. “They were all modest means,” says Ken. ‘I had an uncle who worked in the sandpits, extracting the sand used to build most of New York City. An uncle sold kerosene from house to house. One was a truck driver. I had an aunt who was a seamstress. Two of my distant cousins became police and firefighters, who were killed on September 11. They weren’t even on duty that day, but they wanted to try to help. These are the people I come from: humble, hardworking and loving people.


Ken started working at age 12. He sold wreaths of flowers from door to door during the holiday season and mowed the lawn in summer. When he was 14, his brother entered the army and Ken inherited his work at the local meat market. He worked three hours a day after school and all day on Saturdays. A few years later, he worked as a cashier and worked for UPS or the post office during the high Christmas season. I also worked evenings at a service station. When time allowed, he served as a plumber’s assistant for his father. “My parents wanted me to go to college,” says Ken, “but my father thought that if I learned a trade, I would always have to resort to that if all else failed.”

Ken did little to distinguish himself academically in high school. Looking back on those days, he believes he could not relate academic achievement to success. The night of his high school graduation, the principal of his school, a man that Ken admired a lot, told Ken’s mother and father that they were wasting their limited resources by sending him to college. He felt that Ken would leave at the end of his first semester.

A few months before high school graduation, Ken visited friends at Bucknell University and before leaving campus, he met with the registrar. Soon after, he received an acceptance letter to Bucknell. At the end of the written letter, there was a handwritten message from the registrar, saying: “In college, you will have to work much harder than in high school.”

Ken’s parents mortgaged his home to send his son to college, and during his first semester, Ken did everything he could to fulfill his director’s prophecy. At the end of the first quarter, I was failing each course. His economics professor called him at his office. Once Ken sat down, Professor Headly pulled out a recent Ken test booklet and said that while Ken’s English was horrible, he was impressed with his understanding of the subject. He asked Ken how he was doing in his other classes. Ken was honest and told him he was failing all of his classes. Professor Headly told Ken that if he tried his best, he would contact all of Ken’s other teachers to see if the semester could be saved. Before Ken left the meeting


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One Nation one Ration card, Free Food Schemes Falter, Marginal Beneficiaries Covered

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One nation one ration card, free food schemes falter, marginal beneficiaries covered
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One Nation one Ration card

A nation’s ration card plan and the distribution of free food grains, the two measures announced by the Center as a panacea for millions of migrants facing hunger and homelessness during the Covid-19 shutdown, appear to have failed. Data presented by government officials to a standing committee of Parliament suggests that there is a large gap between the planned coverage of the plans and the actual beneficiaries on the ground.

One Nation One Ration Card – Turtle-Paced Deployment

As of July 2020, only 2,000 interstate transactions were made through the ePoS mechanism. That means one nation’s ration card scheme benefited just 13,000 migrants. The total food grains distributed through the scheme was just 31,500 kg.
These details were provided by Food Department officials during a statement to the Parliamentary Labor Commission earlier this week.

Compared to the government’s claims that 24 states and 90 percent of the ration shops are already integrated into the scheme, 31,500 kg of food grains accessed is terrible.

There are a total of 5.35 lakh fair price stores in India catering to Rs 23 crore ration card holders in the country. In the last three months, the second wave of migration is taking place as migrant workers slowly return to their workplace. And a nation’s ration card scheme is ideally positioned to solve the problems they face.

Yet the Department of Food and Public Distribution in its July 2020 monthly report has practically admitted that one nation’s ration card scheme, one is struggling to make an impact.

Paragraph 3 of the department’s July report highlights that “under the PDS reforms, a total of 4.88 lakh (90.4 percent) Fair Price Stores (FPS) has been automated through the installation of electronic Point of Sale (ePoS) devices. ) “.

The monthly report adds that the national/interstate portability facility under a one-nation ration card plan was enabled in four other states / UT: Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur, Nagaland, and Uttarakhand, August 2020 distribution month.

While the department claims that with the integration of these four States, a total of 24 States / UTs are now seamlessly integrated into a single national portability group, the last line of paragraph 3 reads: “However, the number of transactions remains low due to Covid-19 related reasons. “

One Nation one Ration card

July 2020 Department of Food and Public Distribution Report

PDS store owners say the ePoS system does not work in remote areas due to connectivity issues.

The ePoS facility is key to a nation’s ration card scheme. This allows ration cardholders the freedom to extract food grains under the PDS scheme anywhere in India instead of being restricted to where the card is registered.

The one-nation ration card scheme, launched on June 1, 2020, plans to cover the entire country by March 31, 2021. However, the established mechanism has not provided access to the migrant workforce in most places.

Free food grains scheme: States fail to deliver

The free food grains scheme meant to be an instant remedy for migrants, who were left jobless and homeless due to the COVID crisis, did not reach them. Under the AtmaNirbhar Bharat (ANB) Program, the Center had allocated 8 lakh metric tons of food grains. The free grain was supposed to be distributed to approximately 8 million migrants across the country by the respective state governments and the Center was to pick up the bill.

Of the 8 metric lakh tons, nearly 80 percent or 6.39 metric lakh tons reached the states. But by August 5, a scant 2.46 lakh metric tons had been distributed among migrants who, faced with hunger, had started walking hundreds of kilometers to their places of origin. This equates to roughly 31 percent of the food grains received by the states and 39 percent of the grains allocated by the Center.

Of the total 8 million intended beneficiaries, only 2.5 million gained access to free food grains to survive. That means the states failed about 5.5 crores of migrants and this explains the desperation that forced the migrants to march back home.

The crisis faced by migrants can be understood by the fact that there are 81 million people covered by the National Food Security Plan and a large majority of them are poor, but only 8 million million were identified as specific beneficiaries. By comparison, experts believe that nearly 30 percent of Indians faced severe hardship during the running of the bulls in India.

Obstacle in implementing a nation’s ration card plan

The NDA’s ambitious government ration card program is poised to lose national coverage before the March 2021 deadline.

For the scheme to be operational, the beneficiaries of the public distribution system (PDS) must link their ration card with Aadhaar. In the meantime, the government should enable biometric verification at fair-price stores across the country. Once this is done, the ration cards will become portable and can be used by cardholders at any PDS store nationwide after biometric verification.

The biggest obstacle to the scheme is poor connectivity issues. While the government claims that most regions of the country now have a data link PDS store, the owners say their ePoS machines are down and they have to write down the details manually as without the internet they can’t do the verification biometric.

The second obstacle is the opposition of states like West Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Assam, Odisha and Chhattisgarh, and the complete lack of unanimity.

While TMC’s government in Bengal has announced free rations until May next year, Odisha wants a nation’s ration card to be hybrid in nature that covers areas where the PDS network is poor. Chhattisgarh does not want to integrate, as it already has a robust PDS system that provides food grains to the weaker sections.

Government officials claim that food grain distribution is also a political issue and that each state wants its own scheme rather than being integrated into a single central scheme.


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Three Capitals For Ap

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Three captials for APAP Governor Biswabhusan Harichandan Passed bill of Three Capital. Ap governor Cancelled CRDA 2014 administrative decentralization bills. Here Visakhapatnam as the administrative capital, Kurnool as the legal capital and Amravati as the legislative capital Announced. Now its Official AP Has Three Capital comes to Existence.On January 20, two bills were announced in the AP Assembly, while the Legislature introduced them to the Standing Committee. At this circumstance, the Assembly on June 16 passed the decentralization and CRDA withdrawal bills for the second time.


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7th Nizam’s eldest daughter-in-law dead

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ఏడవ నిజాం కూతురు బేగం కన్నుమూత.

ఏడవ నిజాం మీర్ ఉస్మాన్ అలీఖాన్ సంతానంలో బ్రతికున్న ఏకైక వ్యక్తి, ఆయన కుమార్తె బషీరున్నిసా బేగం(93) కన్నుమూసింది.కొంతకాలంగా అనారోగ్యంతో బాధపడుతున్న పడుతుంది. ఆమె ఆరోగ్యం మరింత క్షిణించడంతో ఈ తెల్లవారు జామున తుదిశ్వాస విడిచింది. బషీరున్నిసా బేగం 1927 సంవత్సరంలో జన్మించారు. ఆమెకు అలీ పాషాగా పేరొందిన నావాబ్ కాసిం యార్ జంగ్‌తో పెళ్లి జరిగింది.

వీరికి ఒక కుమార్తె కూడా ఉంది. కుమార్తె పేరు రషీదున్నిసా బేగం. పురాణీ హవేలీలో నివసిస్తున్నారు. అలీ పాషా 1998 సంవత్సరంలో మరణించారు. బషీరున్నిసా బేగం మరణం పట్ల పలువురు ప్రముఖులు తీవ్ర సానుభూతిని వ్యక్తం చేశారు. ఆమె భౌతికకాయాన్ని సందర్శించి నివాళులు అర్పిస్తున్నారు. ప్రార్థనల అనంతరం అంత్యక్రియలను నిర్వహించనున్నారు. పాతబస్తీలోని దర్గా యాహియా పాషా స్మశానవాటికలో బషీరున్నిసా బేగం అంత్యక్రియలు జరుపనున్నారు.


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